We Have a Vision

eyeTrust
Blog

Many of my colleagues went on missions and I (Taylor Chung) also wanted to experience the joy in helping others. In August 2013, a medical team, optometry/optical, and pharmacy team traveled to Honduras to conduct 3 remote clinics in the villages surrounding Guaimaca. The short term mission allowed us to see over 700 patients in need of eye and medical care, distributed clothing, supplements and stationary items, help distribute fresh water to the communities, and most importantly put smiles on people’s faces.

 

I was part of the optometry/optical team and every time we had the chance, our entire team would post blurbs of our accomplishments on our facebook page. Here is what we had to say:

 

“After a long day of plane and bus rides, we made it safely to Guaimaca, Honduras! Praise the LORD! On our flight to Honduras from Miami, the pilot informed us that we needed to land at San Pedro Sula first because there was a problem with the brakes and the wiring of the spoiler. After waiting an hr, we were told the problem could not be fixed so we hopped onto a 5 hr bus ride to Tegucigalpa, which was our original airport destination. Upon arriving to Tgucigalpa, we embarked on another bus ride for 2 hours to Guaimaca, where the Hospital and living quarters. We are all very tired despite having slept on the rides. We’ll be attending church bright and early tomorrow, so we should get some sleep now. We’ll continue to keep you all posted!

 

Amanda Tam & Alison Zhou
(on behalf of the Honduras Medical Team)”

 

“Today, we attended a spanish church service. Even though we weren’t able to understand the sermon, we were able to worship with the locals! In the afternoon, we visited an orphanage and the founders shared a very profound testimony about trusting in God’s direction. Through the years with all the trials, they now own an 1100 acre orphanage, home to 600 children! Then, we got to play with the children, and we could see how happy they were. We saw God’s hand at work in rescuing these children from unfortunate circumstances.

 

We came back from the orphanage and had a huge packing party! We organized glasses, practiced our evangelical skit, learned how to make balloon animals and bracelets, and packed vitamins and pills for our mobile medical clinic tomorrow.

 

We are driving 2 hours into a village in the mountains of Honduras tomorrow, and we’ll be leaving the hospital bright and early at 7am!

 

Billie Leung & Jason Chan”

 

“Today we were off by 7 for a 2 hour vehicle ride (buses couldn’t get up the mountain) into the village for our first medical/eye team mission. Throughout the day we treated 290 patients in total where patients would go through the medical clinic, followed by the eye clinic and finishing off in the pharmacy and donations department. In the medical clinic, many patients were treated for worms and received their vitamins. Many women would come with 4-8 children. Patients then flooded into the eye clinic and many who required eye glasses were provided with a pair. Every patient also received a pair of sunglasses to prevent cataracts. The pharmacy placed the necessary medications and donations in bags and provided it to the patients very efficiently. Throughout the day, the evangelism team also worked really hard in providing kids with balloons, putting on skits to demonstrate the Gospel as well as coordinate a choir performance by the entire team and a special karate show by Taylor.

 

Tomorrow, we will be heading out to our next village for something similar… God has been extremely good so far and every individual on our team is filled with energy and passion to serve the people of Honduras. We are humbled and reminded of how blessed we are to be here sharing the love from our team and also those who have sent us.

 

Signing off for tonight as we continue preparations for tomorrow…

 

Adios Amigos!

 

Eva & Erica”

 

“Hey folks, we had a great day today!

 

It’s like a roller coaster: lots of ups and downs, heads turning and twisting, bumps and lots of nausea. This is how mornings feel like when we travel up the mountains to the remote villages. Never have ever I enjoyed the soft and subtle earth as it lays beneath my feet when I get off the truck. I breathe a sigh of relief *ahhhhh*… I look at the crowd and I’m greeted with a sea of smiling faces with eyes that are eager to meet the foreigners.

 

Today’s balloon-making went smoother than yesterday, but the process is not as easy as it sounds. Afterall, a dog, flower, and sombrero are clearly different in shape. Despite the strong Honduran sunshine and various requests that are brought upon us, seeing the children’s grins on their faces after receiving their balloon makes it all worth it. The sombreros were clearly a hit today!

 

In the eye clinic, we saw around 200 patients. We saw some patients with pterygiums, cataracts, and amblyopia. One of the patients had a macular scar in her right eye. Unfortunately, we were unable to restore her vision, but we provided her with glasses to help her see well in the other eye. We helped another child patient with lazy eye through counselling. We advised her to patch her left eye and wear +2.00 glasses to allow her to regain sight and see more clearly in that eye. Overall, although it was a busy day, we are very thankful to have the chance to serve the Hondurans and provide them with the vision care they need.

 

Medicine has so many different facets and there are so many stories to share but I want to highlight the holistic approach that the doctors take in providing care to the Hondurans. We care for the physical needs by addressing the current issues they have and we also care for their future needs by giving them essential medicines like antiparasitics, vitamins and tylenol. We care for their spiritual needs by praying for them and sharing God’s love with them by telling them that Jesus died for the sins and came to give them life to the fullest.

 

They say the third time’s the charm and since our first 2 versions were deleted for stochastic reasons. This update is a charm as well. Good night and farewell!

 

Izumi, Rex and Taylor”

 

“Hi Everyone,

 

Today we went for a 1 hour bus ride to a town closer by the hospital.
The town was more affluent than the other two towns visited but it was the busiest day so far. We were impressed with the electricity, infrastructure, and general living conditions of the people. It was a huge improvement in comparison to the 2 villages we visited earlier but a far cry from what we know to be normal back in Toronto.

 

We reached the school at around 8:30am and was greeted by about 100 people. We found ourselves more familiar with the set up and it was a blessing to have a bit more space and natural light in the optometery clinic, medical center and pharmacy. In the optometry clinic, around 300 people came through in which we were able to provide the appropriate glasses and sunglasses for.

 

Childrens Ministry was packed with the most children since the trip began. We enjoyed doing crafts such as bracelets, colouring and martial arts with the children. We were able to do two skits for the people at the clinic and the Gospel was shared by a Honduran Pastor after the skit.

 

A few of us left early to do Water Ministry back at the hospital. We loaded a truck with clean water from the hospital and went to a town about 30 min drive away. The town, like many surrounding it, did not have access to clean water. Families lined up with industrial buckets and gasoline cans, eagar to fill up on during an infrequent trip. In perspective the people were in better condition as it is not the dry season. We will continue with the Water Ministry tomorrow as well.

 

Please pray for those on the team that have been battling injuries and illnesses. We want to finish this trip off healthy and strong!

 

David & Brandon”

 

“Hey all you lovely people,

 

So today, we went to an army base for our clinic. Within the army base was a small school with many excited children. We served over 250 people today including the nearby locals. As this was our last day of service, we gave away the last of our donations and the rest of our medical supplies.

 

Along with the medical mission today, a few of our team members went on a “water ministry mission” to the villages near the hospital. The village that we went to for the Water Ministry today had a broken water pipe that the government determined was too expensive to fix. It really is an eye-opener to see all the lifestyles of the Honduran people here and how clean water is a precious commodity that most of us in first world countries take for granted everyday.

 

As our trip starts to wind down, we start to say bye to some of our fellow missionaries and staff. If it were not for the help of the translators, we would not be able to communicate and provide the necessary care to the people here. If it were not for the missionaries, we would have no way to access the remote villages. It is only an eternal mission that only some of us wish we can live.

 

On the whole, this mission trip has opened up our eyes and hearts to the never-ending need of God’s children to help others in need.

 

Christian & Adrian”

 

“Hi everyone!

 

We are all back! Most of us just arrived in Toronto. A lucky few of us are in Orlando enjoying some well deserved rest.

 

It was sad to leave Honduras, and some of the amazing things God is doing there but we are eager to share with you our experiences.

 

Thank you so much for your support and please stay tuned for more details !!

 

Allison Dave n Diana”

 

Click Here to See the Facebook Page

Hi,

 

My name is Taylor Chung and I am a student optician with a bachelor of technology. I want to share you my story and show you how together we can make a difference.

 

I never thought that I would make the career choice to become an Optician after studying Graphic Communications Management and completing my undergrad at Ryerson University. The decision felt easy because I knew I had my family to support me. Both my parents are Optometrist and they have been working in the field for over 25 years. In my second year of university, my older sister got accepted to the Optometry program at the University of Waterloo. Now, I am proud to call her, Dr. Cassandra Chung, OD. I also have an aunt, Dr. Nancy Chung, OD, who is an Optometrist. Recently, her daughter got accepted into the Optometry program at the University of Waterloo. My family has taught me a lot and I strongly believe that with our combined knowledge, together we can make a difference.

 

My father and I started eyeTrust with one vision in mind, which is to help the eye care community by providing a foundation where eye care professionals can better collaborate to ensure prosperity and growth. Every individual has their support network, which may consist of friends, mentors, family, role models, or even pets. I always see my parents with their support network of eye care professionals. Their network not only changes their professional life, but their social life as well. My parents have created many friends within the eye care industry and I know that is important in any career.

 

Together, my family and I want to help the next generation of eye care professionals by sharing our knowledge, experiences, advice, and providing resources that will jump start their career. We would also want to continue connecting with other eye care professionals to develop a stronger network that will help us grow professionally and socially. The first step to any journey is acknowledging the purpose. My mission is not only to help other eye care professionals, but to provide eye care services and products to people who need it the most.

 

Overall, I would love to meet and collaborate with other eye care professionals because together we can make a difference.

 

P.S. Meet my family:

 

family